Archive | July, 2013

DSWD Field Office X Budget

Summary of Allotment and Obligation Balances  as of June 30, 2013

CENTERS AND INSTITUTIONS DIRECT RELEASE

 

 ALLOTMENT RECEIVED

 OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

 UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

Home for Girls

2,600,000.00

1,624,099.79

975,900.21

62.46%

RSCC

2,500,000.00

882,451.15

1,617,548.85

35.29%

Regional Haven

2,200,000.00

906,630.03

1,293,369.97

41.21%

RRCY

2,000,000.00

1,258,916.59

741,083.41

62.95%

FO (Retained)

3,708,500.00

3,003,699.48

704,800.52

80.99%

CIU (Retained)

447,000.00

42,567.00

404,433.00

9.52%

TOTAL

13,455,500.00

7,718,364.04

5,737,135.96

57.36%

PERSONNEL SERVICES

ALLOTMENT RECEIVED

OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF

UTILIZATION

(TARA) A11c2a

33,063,000.00

17,228,954.53

15,834,045.47

52.10%

(Center) A11d1a

13,284,896.00

7,319,967.68

5,964,928.32

55.10%

TOTAL

46,347,896.00

24,548,922.21

21,798,973.79

52.97%

 

MAINTENANCE AND OTHER OPERATING EXPENSES

 ALLOTMENT RECEIVED

 OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

(TARA) A11c2a

6,192,000.00

3,685,630.12

2,506,369.88

59.52%

(Center) A11d1a

15,830,000.00

7,718,364.04

8,111,635.96

48.76%

TOTAL

22,022,000.00

11,403,994.16

10,618,005.84

51.78%

 

LOCALLY FUNDED

ALLOTMENT RECEIVED

OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

SP (B1e)

91,424,000.00

46,021,899.67

45,402,100.33

50.34%

SEA-K (B1f)

15,549,000.00

9,024,040.28

6,524,959.72

58.04%

SF (B1b)

171,184,000.00

169,087,838.37

2,096,161.63

98.78%

TIP (B1d)

638,000.00

246,046.60

391,953.40

38.57%

TOTAL

278,795,000.00

224,379,824.92

54,415,175.08

80.48%

CENTRALLY MANAGED FUND

 

 ALLOTMENT RECEIVED

 OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

 UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

GASSD –

( A1a1a)

263,538.00

117,140.10

146,397.90

44.45%

CFW – (A11c3d)

8,189,270.68

7,727,017.50

462,253.18

94.36%

PPD – (A11A1)

31,300.00

19,687.00

11,613.00

62.90%

Prog. Dev – (A11a2)

385,560.00

148,686.00

236,874.00

38.56%

ABSNET – (A11b1)

146,625.00

66,606.50

80,018.50

45.43%

Training – (A11c1a1)

156,064.00

134,366.00

21,698.00

86.10%

QRF –Training (A11c3a)

36,900.00

36,696.00

204.00

99.45%

OP/PWD – (A11c3b)

83,600.00

82,784.50

815.50

99.02%

PSU – (A11c3c)

35,178,181.48

1,327,192.50

33,850,988.98

3.77%

SF – (B1b.18)

22,880.00

22,880.00

100%

TIP – (Bid.18)

285,100.00

80,600.00

204,500.00

28.27%

Social Pension (B1e.18)

2,016,600.00

2,016,600.00

0%

SEA-K – (B1f)

23,174,177.48

15,267,868.08

7,906,309.40

65.88%

TOTAL

69,969,796.64

25,031,524.18

44,938,272.46

35.77%

 

 

LOCALLY FUNDED
2012 – FO Continuing

ALLOTMENT RECEIVED

OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

IDPs – (B1c)

100,938.75

100,938.75

100%

TIP – (B1e)

31,904.50

31,901.50

100%

SF – (B1b)

1,767.68

1,767.68

100%

Social Pension-(B1f)

88,658.21

88,644.75

13.46

99.99%

TOTAL

223,266.14

223,252.68

13.46

99.99%

 

CENTRALLY MANAGED FUND
2012 – FO Continuing

 

 ALLOTMENT RECEIVED

 OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

GASSD (A1a1a)

8,056.40

538.00

7,518.40

6.68%

PPD (A11a1)

51,913.25

51,685.35

227.90

99.56%

Program Dev’t (A11a2)

59,720.25

59,720.25

100%

ABSNET (A11b1)

79,897.14

79,897.14

100%

Capability Bldg. (A11c1a)

55,107.20

55,107.20

100%

IDP (A11c3a)

7,756.39

7,428.00

328.39

95.77%

OPD/PWD (A11c3b)

12,428.50

12,428.50

100%

Protective Services (A11c3c)

164,628.84

164,622.24

6.60

99.99%

QRF (A11c3d)

10,003,845.88

10,003,845.88

100%

SEA-K (B1g1)

753,399.80

753,399.80

100%

TP (B1e.18)

40,062.72

40,062.72

100%

SF (B1b.18)

118,962.68

118,962.68

100%

SP (B1f.18)

3,925.00

3,925.00

100%

TOTAL

11,359,704.05

11,351,622.76

8,081.29

99.93%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUMMARY

 

 ALLOTMENT RECEIVED

 OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

 UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

CURRENT APPROPRIATION

Direct Release:      

Centers

13,455,500.00

7,718,364.04

5,737,135.96

57.36%

PS

46,347,896.00

24,548,922.21

21,798,973.79

52.47%

MOOE

22,022,000.00

11,403,994.16

10,618,005.84

51.78%

Locally Funded

278,795,000.00

224,379,824.92

54,415,175.08

80.48%

CENTRALLY MANAGED FUND

69,969,796.64

25,031,524.18

44,938,272.46

35.77%

TOTAL

430,590,192.64

293,082,629.51

137,507,563.13

68.06%

2012 FO CONTINUING APPROPRIATION

Locally Funded

223,266.14

223,252.68

13.46

99.99%

CENTRALLY MANAGED FUND

11,359,704.05

11,351,622.76

8,081.29

99.93%

TOTAL

11,582,970.19

11,574,875.44

8,094.75

99.93%

GRAND TOTAL

442,173,162.83

304,657,504.95

137,515,657.88

68.90%

 

PDAF

2012 CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS

NAME OF CONGRESSMEN

 BALANCE as of December 31, 2012

 OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

 UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

Emano

771,224.60

530,206.90

241,017.70

68.75%

Rufus

2,929,180.61

2,929,180.61

100%

Maximo/ABAMIN

467,426.68

467,426.68

100%

Flores F

105,000.00

105,000.00

100%

Pimentel

585,300.00

575,100.00

10,200.00

98.26%

Mariano R.

185,000.00

185,000.00

0%

Pangilinan

400,000.00

97,173.75

302,826.25

24.29%

Legarda, Loren

700,000.00

700,000.00

0%

TOTAL

6,143,131.89

4,704,087.94

1,439,043.95

76.57%

 

 

PDAF

2013 CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS

NAME OF CONGRESSMEN

 ALLOTMENT RECEIVED

 OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

 UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

Ocampos

3,000,000.00

3,000,000.00

100%

Rufus

4,700,000.00

4,700,000.00

100%

F. Marcos Jr.

200,000.00

16,000.00

184,000.00

8%

TOTAL

7,900,000.00

7,716,000.00

184,000.00

97.67%

CURRENT APPROPRIATION

NAME OF CONGRESSMEN

 ALLOTMENT RECEIVED

 OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

 UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

FLORES

300,000.00

64,000.00

236,000.00

21.33%

RODRIGUEZ RUFUS

5,000,000.00

2,272,406.95

2,727,593.05

45.45%

EMANO

899,800.00

896,298.00

3,502.00

99.61%

MAXIMO/ABAMIN

1,300,000.00

212,573.32

1,087,426.68

16.35%

MANNY VILLAR

500,000.00

500,000.00

0%

T. GUINGONA

1,500,000.00

1,500,000.00

0%

C. GONZALES

70,000.00

70,000.00

0%

TOTAL

9,569,800.00

3,445,278.27

6,124,521.73

36%

SUMMARY

(2012 Continuing and 2013 Current and Continuing)

NAME OF CONGRESSMEN

 ALLOTMENT

 OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

EMANO

1,671,024.60

1,426,504.90

244,519.70

85.36%

F. MARCOS Jr.

200,000.00

16,000.00

184,000.00

8%

FLORES

405,000.00

169,000.00

236,000.00

41.72%

LEGARDA, Loren

700,000.00

700,000.00

0%

MARIANO R.

185,000.00

185,000.00

0%

MAXIMO/ABAMIN

1,767,426.68

680,000.00

1,087,426.68

38.47%

OCAMPOS

3,000,000.00

3,000,000.00

0%

PANGILINAN

400,000.00

97,173.75

302,826.25

24.29%

PIMENTEL

585,300.00

575,100.00

10,200.00

98.26%

RODRIGUEZ RUFUS

12,629,180.61

9,901,587.56

2,727,593.05

78.40%

MANNY VILLAR

500,000.00

500,000.00

0%

T. GUINGONA

1,500,000.00

1,500,000.00

0%

C. GONZALES

70,000.00

70,000.00

0%

TOTAL

23,612,931.89

15,865,366.21

7,747,565.68

67.19%

SPECIAL PROJECTS

Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program
Centrally Managed Fund

LP

ALLOTMENT RECEIVED

OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

MOOE

2,267,000.00

396,168.34

1,870,831.66

17%

Training

379,870.00

326,790.82

53,079.18

86%

Cost of Service

3,907,977.00

2,085,677.29

1,822,299.71

53%

TOTAL

6,554,847.00

2,808,636.45

3,746,210.55

43%

 

GOP

ALLOTMENT RECEIVED

OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

ADMINISTRATIVE COST

129,851,293.64

117,763,011.53

12,088,282.11

91%

CAPABILITY BUILDING (TRAININGS)

11,194,299.16

6,355,900.00

4,838,398.36

56.78%

MONITORING & EVAL. ACTIVITIES

7,788,963.92

5,551,076.61

2,237,887.31

71%

ADVOCACY

3,271,508.00

603,600.00

2,667,908.00

18%

MCCT

3,271,508.00

603,600.00

2,667,908.00

53%

CSO ACTIVITIES

2,022,730.00

2,022,730.00

0%

SET 7 VALIDATION

131,422.60

131,422.60

0%

TOTAL

159,238,009.24

132,932,964.93

26,305,044.31

83.48%

SUMMARY

ALLOTMENT RECEIVED

OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

Loan Proceeds (LP)

6,554,847.00

2,808,636.45

3,746,210.55

43%

GOP

159,238,009.24

132,932,964.93

26,305,044.31

83.48%

GRAND TOTAL

165,792,856.24

135,741,601.38

30,051,254.86

81.87%

KALAHI-CIDSS
Centrally Managed Fund

 

ALLOTMENT RECEIVED

OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

GOP

CURRENT

11,276,556.48

5,799,773.96

5,476,782.52

51.43%

2012 – CONTINUING

6,360,141.95

4,925,955.21

1,434,186.74

77.45%

TOTAL

17,636,698.43

10,725,729.17

6,910,969.26

60.81%

LP

CURRENT

4,567,521.00

3,630,873.12

936,647.88

79.49%

2012 – CONTINUING

3,188,950.00

2,348,373.07

840,576.93

73.64%

TOTAL

7,756,471.00

5,979,246.19

1,777,224.81

77.08%

GRAND TOTAL

25,393,169.43

16,704,975.36

8,688,194.07

65.78%

 

KC – PAMANA

 

ALLOTMENT RECEIVED

OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

CURRENT

2,265,884.80

97,984.40

2,167,900.40

4.32%

2012

CONTINUING

2,881,280.00

2,170,640.14

710,639.86

75.33%

Capital outlay

145,230.00

145,230.00

0%

TOTAL

5,292,394.80

2,268,624.54

3,023,770.26

42.87%

 

PAMANA

ALLOTMENT RECEIVED

OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

SLP

45,008,001.00

37,277,282.48

7,730,718.52

82.82%

PSB

18,500,000.00

18,500,000.00

0%

TOTAL

63,508,001.00

37,277,282.48

26,230,718.52

58.70%

 

 

AUSAID-GRANT

 

 ALLOTMENT RECEIVED  OBLIGATIONS INCURRED  UNOBLIGATED BALANCE % OF UTILIZATION

CURRENT

468,104.80 468,104.80 0%

CAPITAL OUTLAY

51,200.00 51,200.00 0%

2012 CONTINUING

                593,630.00 442,034.71 151,595.29 74.46%

TOTAL

1,112,934.80                  442,034.71 670,900.09 39.72%

 

SUMMARY

 

ALLOTMENT RECEIVED

OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

KALAHI-CIDSS

25,393,169.43 16,704,975.36 8,688,194.07 65.78%

KC-PAMANA

5,292,394.80 2,268,624.54 3,023,770.26 42.87%

SLP/PSB-PAMANA

63,508,001.00 37,277,282.48 26,230,718.52 58.70%

AUSAID

1,112,934.80 442,034.71 670,900.09 39.72%
TOTAL 95,306,500.03 56,692,917.09 38,613,582.94 59.48%

 

NHTS-PR

ALLOTMENT RECEIVED

OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

Direct Release:

CURRENT

2,824,000.00

1,238,617.31

1,585,382.69

44%

CONTINUING

20,791.67

20,791.67

0%

Total Direct Release

2,844,791.67

1,238,617.31

1,606,174.36

43.54%

CMF:

CURRENT

43,000.00

16,000.00

27,000.00

37%

CONTINUING

149,603.36

29,600.00

120,003.36

20%

Total  CMF

192,603.36

45,600.00

147,003.36

23.68%

GRAND TOTAL

3,037,395.03

1,284,217.31

1,753,177.72

42.28%

TATSULO – Convergence

Centrally Managed Fund

ALLOTMENT RECEIVED

OBLIGATIONS INCURRED

UNOBLIGATED BALANCE

% OF UTILIZATION

ADMIN COST

6,352,906.79

3,470,925.76

2,881,981.03

55%

M & E

396,000.00

163,160.00

232,840.00

41%

CAPABILITY BLDG.

4,169,477.73

2,819,856.25

1,349,621.48

68%

TOTAL

10,918,384.52

6,453,942.01

4,464,442.51

59%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ACCOUNTING UNIT

 

Detailed Balance Sheet

For the month ended June 30, 2013

Fund 101

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DETAILED STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES

For the month ended June 30, 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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DSWD’s KALAHI-CIDSS program wins International Development Award (Re-posted)

(THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE IS AN ENTRY POSTED IN BRIEFING ROOM, DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE AND DEVELOPMENT)

Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan-Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services (KALAHI-CIDSS), one of the poverty alleviation programs of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) in partnership with the World Bank, was chosen as one of the awardees of the U.S. Treasury’s second annual Development Impact Honors Awards, beating over 40 other candidates.

The award will be given on July 25, 2013, at the Main Treasury Building in North Washington, USA. Aside from the awardees, attendants of the event include members of the U.S. Congress and other U.S. government agencies, as well as representatives from the developmental sector.

The Development Impact Awards recognizes the different projects supported by multilateral development banks all over the world. The awards are meant to distinguish development-oriented programs, such as those that fight poverty, hunger, and disease. The entries were judged based on criteria such as quality of results, focus on priority sectors, innovations used, and risk mitigations strategies utilized.

Kalahi-CIDSS was chosen as one as the awardees out of the other entries because it is “especially high-impact and noteworthy,” according to U.S. Secretary of Treasury Jacob J. Lew in his letter to Worldbank President Dr. Jim Kim.

Kalahi-CIDSS is one of the three core social protection programs of DSWD in combating poverty. It uses the community-driven development (CDD) strategy to empower ordinary citizens to actively and directly participate in local governance by identifying their own community needs, planning, implementing, and monitoring projects together to address local poverty issues.

Some of the results of Kalahi-CIDSS include improved access of communities to basic services, increased community involvement, and positive impact in household wellbeing.

The World Bank has been a partner of Kalahi-CIDSS since its inception in 2003. John Roome, World Bank Sustainable Development Director for East Asia Pacific, is pleased with the award, saying, “One of my first field visits was in Kalahi-CIDSS sites. From those early visits, I could see the impact of the project on people’s lives.”

He added that with the advent of the National Community-Driven Development Program (NCDDP), which will scale up the CDD strategy utilized by Kalahi-CIDSS, there will be even greater impact to communities in the country.

From the 364 municipalities covered by Kalahi-CIDSS, NCDDP will be targeting 900 of the poorest municipalities in the Philippines. It was approved by the National Economic Development Authority (NEDA) Board last January 18, and will be launched in late 2013.

Secretary of Social Welfare and Development Corazon “Dinky” Juliano-Soliman was delighted with the recognition. “We are honored to have Kalahi-CIDSS chosen as one of the awardees by the U.S. Treasury,” she said. “We are optimistic that with NCDDP, we will be able to help even more families and communities rise from poverty”, she added.

Last year’s awardees of the Development Impact Honors Awards were the African Development Bank for the Mali-Senegal Road Project, the Asian Development Bank for the Afghanistan Telecom Development Company Project, the Inter-American Development Bank for its Basic Nutrition Program, and the World Bank for their Amazon Region Protected Areas Program.

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BAYANIHAN DEFIES ODDS, EMPOWERS COMMUNITIES THROUGH SHEER WILL AND DETERMINATION

Bayanihan” or the spirit of communal unity and cooperation has been a Filipino heritage for generations. The image of a group of people carrying a native hut is one of the images we as Filipinos oh, so dearly patronize. But do we still practice this tradition right now? Do people on this day and age of Candy Crush and iPads still relinquish traditional practices that have for so long been a part of our lives? Or has bayanihan been minimized to just a thing of the past; a form of folklore we only speak of during our “back in my days” stories we tell the younger generations?

People have forgotten this priceless gesture of solidarity; a simple show of camaraderie and genuine act of care for those in the neighborhood. Today, majority of people have belittled this gallant act, and have even tagged it as “old school” or “baduy” (out of style or out dated). But what this tradition has goes beyond trends. It goes beyond what is new and hip.  It is a simple gesture of oneness and compassion for others but it ensures strengthening of relationships within the community.

Indeed this is an old thing; an old thing that still works pretty well in bringing the community together and sure enough gets things done even with the odds going against the community. Take for instance the success of the Barangays in Kauswagan, Lanao del Norte implementing the Payapa at Masaganang Pamayanan (PAMANA), the national government’s program and framework for peace and development which is being implemented in areas affected by conflict and communities covered by existing peace agreements. Through sheer determination and bayanihan, several communities get to finish program sub-projects with just limited budgets.

The PAMANA Project, being implemented by the Kalahi-CIDSS Program of the Department of Social Welfare and Development provides barangays of qualified municipalities Php 300,000 to fund sub-projects that would answer to the direst needs of the barangay that would address conflict issues in their respective communities.

For several people, the Php 300,000 funding for any sub-project is not enough to accommodate sub-projects such as potable water systems, peace centers, farm – to – market roads, and the likes.  But this shortage of funds has challenged the community, bringing about the best ideas from community volunteers implementing the PAMANA. For optimistic persons, the limited funds only open more opportunities to venture into, just to be able to make things work.

Barangay Tugar and Paiton were among those whose most pressing need was potable drinking water, and they saw PAMANA as an opportunity to do something about their problem.  Yes, Php 300,000 was limited for a Gravity Driven Potable Water System (Level2), and may only cover the basic materials for the sub-project, but this was more than enough to start providing solutions to their problems. They showed that when there was strong will, especially from the beneficiaries, there was a sure way to handle the matter.

To compensate for the deficiency in the exact total budget costs, the community volunteers came up with a pretty good idea that would totally solve their problems.  Aside from the Php 300,000 budget from PAMANA, the Local Cash Counterparts form the MLGU and the BLGU, the community decided to revive the bayanihan spirit.  But this will only be effective if everyone believed this would work and bring about success in the project implementation.

It was time to awaken a long-time dead tradition; which was for the community, the only way to deal with the matter.  They all agreed to do “Pahina” or free/voluntary services to complete their water system sub-project.  All the families in their barangay would be willing to dig ditch holes and work on the water reservoir without pay. Everyone was in a schedule to do labor until the job was done.  For those who were not available, they were to provide meals for those working, which is pretty much fair enough according to those doing labor.

Everyone agreed and the rest was history.  Work was finished in just about 5 days; better than any contractual work by any professional.  Indeed the community has proven once and again that in unity, there is definitely success. The bayanihan spirit has once again proven itself worthy even in modern times.

What is wonderful about the success of the project was that it empowered communities to work for a common goal, one that definitely solves their most pressing needs.  Kalahi-CIDSS believes that to empower the communities, there must be enough room for the community to be creative in thinking of solutions for their problems. This is an important matter in empowering them; to let them be responsible for their own sub-projects.

Again, is bayanihan dead in modern times? The answer is definitely and absolutely NOT.  It just needs to be applied in a proper place and time.  The Gravity Driven Potable Water System (Level2) of Barangays Tugar and Paiton, Kauswagan, Lanao del Norte are true testaments of the value of bayanihan.

All it takes is a little bit of unity and cooperation, a bit of will and determination, a sprinkle of sacrifice, and then you have a completed and operational Gravity Driven Potable Water System (Level2) for all the community to enjoy. A little bit of bayanihan goes a long way towards empowerment and self-sufficiency.

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LDN Family is NorMin’s Huwarang Pantawid Pamilya

A family from Lanao del Norte province is the official nominee of Northern Mindanao to the national elimination of Huwarang Pantawid Pamilya 2013.
A native of Barangay Libertad, Kauswagan town of the said province, the Mabanta Family bested four regional nominees coming from Bukidnon, Camiguin, Misamis Occidental and Misamis Oriental provinces.
The Mabanta Family will compete other regional nominees throughout the country this August.
Dagoc Family of Kuguita, Mambajao, Camiguin earned second place while the nominee from Balintawak, Kibawe, Bukidnon got the third slot.
The event aims to recognize families who have religiously followed the conditions of the program and to recognize families who embody or demonstrate adopting the Filipino values and strong family ties.
Written By Oliver Badel Inodeo, Pantawid Pamilya Information Officer

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Livelihood improves in Sapang Dalaga

The municipality of Sapang Dalaga is known to be one of the sources of the food basket of Misamis Occidental. Coco farming, fruits, and vegetables growing and aquamarine products are the main source of people’s income of the municipality.

The Boundary 4P’s SKA, which is composed of 30 Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program beneficiaries, is one of the Self-Employment Assistance Kaunlaran – Association of the Department of Social Welfare and Development based in Boundary, Sapang Dalaga, Misamis Occidental.

Through the DSWD’s Sustainable Livelihood Program, which provides capability building, technical and financial assistance to individuals who are interested to improve their family economic status, the Boundary 4Ps SKA has availed the seed capital assistance for their fruit vending, a small scale business to augment additional family income as one of the income generation project.

The scheme identified by its members is fruit buying and selling. The products are bananas, lansones, durian, marang, papaya, and other fruit trees available in the area.

Aside from receiving cash grants from the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program, which focuses on investing human capital by allowing families to send their children to school and to health centers for regular check-ups, the same members are now enjoying benefits through the Sustainable Livelihood Program. Apparently, their products sold are now highly demanded throughout the area which stabilized their livelihood and income.

The Sustainable Livelihood Program generates greater impact on poverty reduction, maximize the resources and enhance the local skills, knowledge, and collaborative actions between stakeholders for sustainability of outcomes.

Written by Ma. Prima O. Aba, Project Development Officer, and Charmaine P. Tadlas, Regional Information Officer

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REGIONAL GENERAL ASSEMBLY A SUCCESS FOR DSWD FIELD OFFICE X

Regional General Assembly Captured Moments

Regional General Assembly Captured Moments

The Department of Social Welfare and Development Field Office X recently conducted its Regional General Assembly last June 26, 2013 at Chali Beach Resort, Cugman, Cagayan de Oro City. The once in two years activity is an important event to update the department on the latest news and important matters affecting the staff and management in the field office.

The one day activity was filled with interesting activities that surely provided the DSWD employees with the necessary knowledge and important information very much needed to be effective in working with the agency.  Ms. Purita Santa, Assistant Regional Director for Administration welcomed all participants to the activity and wished that the event be fruitful so that the department may benefit from the said gathering.

During the said activity, important matters were discussed/presented. Ms. Portia Roldan, OIC-Chief of the Institutional Development Division presented to the body the latest on the Performance-Based Incentive System-Performance Based Bonus. Ms. Roldan emphasized that the bonus will be given to personnel bureaus or delivery units in accordance to their contribution to the accomplishment of the department’s over-all targets and commitments.

Next presenter was Mr. Joseph Manuel Aguja, Training Specialist II who presented the Feedback Report Template, the proper way of completing requirements for any department staff who would be having  official travel for trainings, workshops, and seminars. Ms. Christine Leyva, Human Resource Development Unit also presented Memorandum Circular No. 6, series 2012 or the Strategic Performance Management System, an important tool at monitoring the competence and effective services of the employees of the department.

ARDA Santa then discussed policies and procedures for department employees traveling abroad. Several misconceptions and matters were clarified during the presentation, which definitely enlightened the agency employees on rules and regulations covering government employees regarding the matter.

A special presentation was also given by Ms. Aloha Jaudian, Representative from the Department of Labor and Employment who shared information about the Kasambahay Law, which definitely gave the DSWD employees a clearer picture of how the law works.

Issues and concerns were then discussed to ensure that operations at the field office would be as smooth as possible. Add to the day good food and exciting games and prizes, the Regional General Assembly was definitely a success. A whopping 165 employees attended the activity, all in the mood for ensuring unity and camaraderie in the workplace.

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DSWD advocates laws on Solo Parents’ and Domestic Workers’ Welfare

Fuelled with the felt needs of being equipped and updated with the existing different major legislations, the Department of Social Welfare and Development conducted Advocacy Forum on June 21, 2013 held at Cagayan de Oro City.

The forum was attended by 50 participants consists of Local Social Workers, and Solo Parents advocates as well as people’s organization representatives.

The invited speaker is presently the Deputy Provincial Prosecutor of Misamis Oriental specialized in Family Court cases, Atty. Malou Romualdo- Sumalpong. She clearly emphasized that Republic Act No. 8972-An Act Providing for the Benefits & Privileges to Solo Parents & their Children, Appropriating Funds therefore & for other purposes.

This Act declares that it is the policy of the State to promote the family as the foundation of the nation, strengthen its solidarity & ensure its total development. The law was enacted to response to the growing number of solo parents who find it difficult to cope with the effects of solo parenting.

Furthermore, the speaker thoroughly shared the details of the new law on Republic Act No. 10361 also known as “The Batas Kasambahay.” The law elaborates the new approved rights & privileges of the domestic workers and employment terms and conditions as stipulated in the Memorandum of Agreement.

Written by Hacelyn B. Barrero, Focal Person

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DSWD Field Office X Participates in the 2nd Northern Mindanao Career Advocacy Congress

The DCAREER ADVOCACY CONGRESSepartment of Social Welfare and Development – Field Office X participated in the recently concluded 2nd Northern Mindanao Career Advocacy Congress held last May 24, 2013, at Pryce Plaza, Cagayan de Oro City.

Represented by the DSWD – FO X Human Resource Management Unit, the whole day affair was conducted by the Department of Labor and Employment – X and participated by various regional government agencies, guidance counselors and school administrators from various private and public schools around the region, representatives from the local government units, the media, and other stakeholders.

The Career Advocacy Congress aims to strengthen the labor trends in the region through strengthened cooperation and partnerships with the various stakeholders in the region.  Ms. Christine Z. Leyva, Unit Head of the Human Resource Development Unit, DSWD FO-X saw the Advocacy Congress as a welcoming development, especially that the activity could now be a venue for the department to introduce existing and upcoming projects and programs.

Ms. Leyva took the opportunity to introduce to the participants the forthcoming implementation of the National Community-Driven Development Program the department will carry out starting July 2013.  “The Career Advocacy Congress is the perfect venue for us to introduce the NCDDP and also a venue to promote the job opportunities for the said program since we will be hiring more than 400 employees in implementing the region-wide project,” Ms. Leyva said.

The conduct of the 2nd Northern Mindanao Career Advocacy Congress was just among the Inter-Agency partnership activities in the region that aims to promote development and sustainability in Northern Mindanao.  Participants of the said activity has seen the significance of the activity and are hopeful that there will be more activities such as this one that will follow in the future.

“The activity does not only showcase programs and job opportunities of the various government agencies and the private sectors, but a good venue in strengthening Private-Public Partnership that will ensure harmony and cooperation among stakeholders in improving lives of people in Northern Mindanao especially in developing tools that will aid career paths for our youth in the region,” Ms. Leyva said.

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